Silicate Sealers vs Silane Siloxane Sealers

Silicate sealers and Silane-Siloxane sealers couldn’t be more different. In fact, the only thing they have in common is that the penetrate into the surface of the concrete.

Silicate sealers are classified as concrete densifiers. They chemically react below the surface to form a hardened crystalline barrier within the pores. This barrier, known as calcium silicate hydrate, is permanent and can only be removed if the concrete itself is removed. Silicate sealers increase the strength of the concrete by reducing the size of the pores. Concrete sealed with a silicate sealer is more resistant to deterioration caused by surface abrasion, and the movement of water up through the pores of the concrete. Silicate sealers do not stop or reduce surface water absorption and they do not leave behind a visible surface film. Their primary purpose is to increase the strength of the concrete.

The most popular types of Silicate sealers are sodium and lithium silicates. Sodium silicate sealers are used on porous concrete while Lithium silicates are often used to seal dense concrete.

Silicate Sealer Reviews:

Silane-Siloxane sealers are classified as water repellent sealers. They chemically react below the surface to form a hydrophobic barrier within the pores. This barrier lasts for roughly 7-10 years and even after the bead goes away, the sealer will continue to work in the pores to reduce surface water absorption. Concrete sealed with a Silane-Siloxane sealer are more resistant to the damaging effects of water absorption such as cracking, spalling, pitting, mold and mildew growth, and efflorescence formation. Silane-Siloxane sealers do not increase the strength of the concrete and they don not leave behind a visible surface film. Their primary purpose to make concrete more resistant to the damaging effects of water absorption.

Silane Siloxane Sealer Reviews:

If your concrete needs an increase in strength, and could also benefit from a water repellent sealer, you would apply a silicate sealer first followed by the application of a water repellent sealer 5-7 days later. Silane-Siloxane sealers can be applied over Silicates, but Silicates can’t be applied over Silane-Siloxanes because the Silane-Siloxane sealer will cause the Silcate (water based) to bead off the surface.